Author Archives: Karrie McLellan

Tips for Using the New Libby App from OverDrive

In case you missed it, OverDrive has release a more user-friendly app named Libby that can be used to consume the library’s downloadable e-books and audiobooks.  Recently, the folks at the OverDrive blog composed a handy tip sheet for getting the most out of Libby.  We hope you find these tips as useful as we did!  Do you have your own tips to share?  Let us know in the comments!

Library Software Upgrade Scheduled

upgrade

The Upper Hudson Library System has scheduled an upgrade of our library management software for 4:00 AM on Tuesday, April 19th.  The process should be completed long before the libraries open.  However, you may experience difficulty logging in to use remote library services (catalog, library account, OverDrive, etc.) during the upgrade.  Thank you for your patience.

Text Message Notifications Have Arrived

sms icon

The Upper Hudson Library System has rolled out another new catalog feature.  Patrons can now opt in to receive SMS (text message) notifications for hold pickups, overdue reminders, and courtesy notices.  SMS notifications will not replace your current notification method (email, phone, mail), but will be an additional service.  If your cell phone carrier charges you for text messaging, standard rates will apply.

How to opt in:

  1. Go to the UHLS library catalog and sign in with your card number and PIN.  Alternatively, use the “My Account” button on the EG Library website.
  2. Click on “Edit account.”
  3. Go to the mobile settings section.  Enter your phone number.  Read the terms and conditions and check the “Opt In” box.
  4. Press “Submit.”
  5. Check your phone for text messages.  You will receive a message to confirm your subscription.  You must reply by typing “Yes” to complete the signup process.
  6. You will receive a message confirming your subscription.

To cancel:

  • Option 1:  Reply STOP, STOP ALL, END, QUIT, CANCEL, or UNSUBSCRIBE to any library SMS notification to stop receiving texts.
  • Option 2:  Ask a staff member to help you unsubscribe.

Will you be using this new service?  Let us know in the comments!

 

Tagging the Library Catalog

tag

Our latest public catalog has some new features that we are excited to see patrons using. One of these features allows patrons to “tag” items in our catalog. The purpose of adding a tag would be to make an item easier to find. For example, if I ran a book club at the library, I might want to add the tag “EG Book Club” to every title we discuss. That way, any patron searching the catalog for “EG Book Club” would find all of those books grouped together in the results.

The Issue

Recently, we have discovered that there may be some confusion about the nature of tags in our catalog. Given some of the community tags we’ve seen, it appears that patrons believe them to be private. Consider the following example:
Tag example 1. If they get it in large print or the e-book version

Clearly, this is a patron’s note to self and not meant for public consumption. Unfortunately, there is no way we can let the patron who added it know that a more effective way to accomplish this privately would be to use the My List feature of the catalog, which we will outline in a moment.

Other patrons may think tagging an item is a way to communicate with library staff:

Tag example 2. Renew e-book

I assure you that no staff member will see this unless they find it by accident.  If you have created your own tags assuming they were private, please help us clean up the catalog and protect your privacy by deleting them.

My List

If you would like to make personal notes to yourself on items in the catalog, there is a more elegant way to do this. It involves an additional click or two, but there are many more options available to you when you use this method. For example, when you add items to a list, you can request them all at once or one at a time. You can also create multiple lists and organize them as you wish.

You can use “My Lists” to save lists of items that you wish to revisit for later use. The content in these lists is stored until you remove it. In “My Lists”, you can create folders to group your stored titles in ways that help you to organize your content. Titles stored in “My Lists” can be viewed and retrieved by logging into your My Account and using the “My Lists” link.  Login to My Account and the search for an item you wish to add to your list.  Click on the icon to “Add to cart.”

Add to cart icon

When you have gathered all of the items for your list in the cart, click on “My Cart” next to your name in the upper right of the screen.

My Cart link screenshot

Click “save to list” and either create a new list or save to a list already created and confirm.  To see your lists, return to your account details by clicking on your name when logged into the catalog. Select the “My Lists” link to view the lists created.  Click on a list name export it or request/delete items on the list.

My Lists link

How would you use the tagging feature in our catalog? Let us know in the comments.

Back By Popular Demand: New Items Lists!

newitemsWhen we moved to our new library software earlier this year, we lost the ability to provide real-time lists of new items ordered by the libraries. If you have been missing this feature, we have great news – it has been restored! Check all libraries here: http://reports.uhls.org/newitems/. See only our library here: http://reports.uhls.org/newitems/EGRN/index.html.

How Does It Work?

The first link will take you to a listing of all Upper Hudson Library System libraries.  Select a library, and you will be presented with a list of item types.  Only item types with newly items will be displayed, so some categories you might expect may not be present.  Click on an item type to see a list of titles that are linked to the catalog for easy requesting.  Check back often, as we are adding new items all the time and the lists are updated overnight.

Each library has a different time frame for “new”, which will be stated at the top of the title list.  The East Greenbush Community Library has chosen 14 days, while some other libraries chose 30 or 90 days.  Keep in mind that donated items, items ordered as replacements, and duplicate copies show up on these lists, as well.  That would account for “new” items with older publication dates.  The category that will most likely show newly released items is the “On Order” category.  While this group is not limited on a single item type or genre, it is often populated by items ordered ahead of publication date.  As soon as the record is created in the catalog, patrons can place requests.

Questions?  Please ask in the comments below or call the library for more information.

 

What’s Up with Windows 10?

windows-10-logoWindows 10 was released at the end of July, though you have probably been hearing about it for much longer than that.  Even if you haven’t been keeping up on tech news, Windows 7 and 8 users will have noticed an icon on their desktops urging them to reserve their free upgrade.  Microsoft states that this will be the last operating system they release.  Going forward, Windows will provide all updates free of charge and do away with supporting multiple operating systems.  In fact, some users will be forced to install updates whether they want to or not.  While this will be helpful from a security and support standpoint, it could spell trouble if any of those updates go awry.  If you have a genuine copy of Windows 7 or later, upgrading to Windows 10 will be free for a year.  After that, you may need to pay for the upgrade.  However, to clarify, there will be no charges after upgrading to Windows 10.  Some readers have seen “free for a year” and assumed that Microsoft would start charging Windows 10 users after a year.  That is not the case.

There is a lot of information about Windows 10 out there, and I have done my best to sort through it and provide links to some of the more helpful resources available.

Because of third-party software concerns, the library will not be upgrading its public computers to Windows 10 for some time yet.  However, I am planning to upgrade one of our staff computers in order to test the new operating system and help me answer questions patrons might have about their computers and other devices.  If you have any questions or comments regarding Windows 10, we’d love to hear about them in the comments!

New Tech in the Library

upgrade

Thanks to a generous grant from the Friends of the East Greenbush Community Library, we have been able to replace some of the outdated technology in the library.

Monitors

If you have used any of our public computers in the last several years, you know that the square, analog monitors were not keeping pace with the way modern video and web content is displayed.  Some patrons also complained that the refresh rate was causing visible flickering on the screen.  We were able to replace all of the monitors at the public computers with digital, widescreen LED monitors.  In addition to improved display, these models are much more energy efficient than their predecessors.  This should save the library money in the long run.

Tech Cart in Meeting Rooms A and B

If you have recently attended a program in meeting rooms A and/or B that required A/V equipment, you may have noticed that the tech cart boasted an ancient LCD projector (for which they no longer make replacement bulbs) and a DVD/VCR combo.  The Friends helped us to purchase a new, more energy efficient DLP projector which projects a very clear image that can be seen on the wall at any lighting level.  We took this opportunity to replace the DVD/VCR with a Blu-ray player, which still supports DVDs.  Because the projector supports HDMI inputs, watching a Blu-ray using the projector is a much higher quality visual experience than watching a VHS tape with the old projector.  This should make the next movie festival much more enjoyable!

We hope you enjoy these improvements to the library.  What would you like to see next?  Let us know in the comments.

Android Security Gets Stagefright

androidA new and nasty vulnerability in the Android operating system, dubbed “Stagefright”, has recently come to light.  Initially, it was reported that this bug would allow a hacker to gain control of an Android device with only a text message.  Once in your phone, a hacker could steal or take over anything on your device and then infect everyone in your contacts.  Until device manufacturers and wireless carriers can issue a fix, Android users were advised to disable the setting to “automatically retrieve” MMS messages in their texting app and Google Hangouts.

A week later, it was reported that the infection could not only arrive via text, but could also be embedded in any number of apps or websites just lying in wait.  Because the bug is surrounded by “safe coding”, security software will not necessarily catch it.

The good news is, lots of people are working on fixing this.  In fact, Samsung and Sprint have already worked together to release a fix for the Samsung Galaxy Note 4.  Unfortunately, their fix only works on that device.  Many more fixes will need to be generated and pushed out to patch up the nearly 950 million vulnerable Android devices out there.  If you are an Android user, be on the lookout for available updates for your device.

For more information about Stagefright, Fortune.com has an excellent article and Q&A on the subject.

Has your device been infected?  Tell us about it in the comments.

 

Library Software Upgrade Report

SierraencoreWelcome to my long overdue update on the software situation in the library.  Since our library system (UHLS) moved to a new library management software at the end of March, the system’s techies have been working hard to get the kinks out of the new system.  Believe it or not, there are still several modules and functions that are still being configured.  The purpose of this post is to let you know which issues are still outstanding and where to get help if you need it.

1.  Notifications

Some people are still experiencing minor issues receiving their notifications.  Most commonly, emails are not received.  Make sure to check your spam folder.  Even if you have already “rescued” a library email from your spam folder and marked the sender safe, emails can come from different library email addresses.  You may need to add several addresses to your email whitelist before the emails will stop going to junk mail.  If you are not receiving notifications and you have already checked your spam folder, please contact the library and let us know.

Some patrons have pointed out that phone notifications do not mention the library where their items are being held.  This can be an issue for power users who pick up items at multiple locations.  At this time, there is no fix for this issue.  We suggest that patrons who are unsure where their items are being held login to the online catalog and click their name in the upper right corner of the screen.  On the left menu of the next screen, select “holds.”  Any items showing “ready for pickup” under status will also list a pickup location.

2. Prompts to request specific items

In some cases, when requesting an item, a patron is prompted to request a specific copy of an item, even though all of the copies are the same.  This is a cataloging issue that all of the libraries are working to fix.  Reports of this issue are few and far between, but it still happens.

3. Blocked from placing a hold

On our previous system, patrons with outstanding charges on their library cards could place holds on items and would be prompted to pay down their fees when checking out an item.  The new system no longer allows holds for any card not in good standing.  Unfortunately, we cannot control this.  If you are blocked from placing a hold, call the Reference Desk (477-7476, option 4) and we can override this restriction and place the hold for you.

4.  Checking out an OverDrive item through the library catalog

Previously, we had two separate catalogs for our physical items (books, CDs, DVDs, etc.) and digital items (OverDrive).  While the two separate catalogs still exist, our new library catalog contains our digital items as well as physical.  You can even check out and download most digital titles without leaving the catalog!  To test this, search the catalog for a title.  In the left menu, look under “format.”  If the item is available as a downloadable audiobook or e-book, there will be options for “downloadable e-book” or “downloadable audiobook.”  You may need to click “more” to see all available formats.  format

If you are looking for a magazine or streaming video, the format categories are less helpful.  Downloadable magazines show up as “downloadable e-books” and streaming videos show up as “DVDs.”  Check the individual record for more clarification:

checkoutvideoIf you click on “Check out with OverDrive”, you will be prompted to sign in if you haven’t already.  Then a window will pop up confirming checkout:

odcheckoutAfter you select “check out”, you can immediately download the title by selecting “Get eBook” if you are using the device you would like to read/watch on.

downloadOtherwise, you can download it later by logging into your account in the OverDrive catalog.  Occasionally, an error message will display, and you will need to go to the OverDrive catalog and sign in to download, anyway.  We’re working on that, too.

error5.  New item notification

We had more direct control over our last system, which allowed UHLS to create add-ons that would use the power of our library catalog to provide extra features for patrons.  One of these add-ons was the ability to subscribe to a “New Items” feed.  This feed would notify subscribers when a new item was added to the catalog.  The popularity of this feature was made clear to us by patrons who were very frustrated when it disappeared.  UHLS knows how much patrons want this feature, and they are working to bring it back.  Because there are still some higher priority bugs to work out with the everyday functioning of the catalog, this feature may need to be on the back burner for a while.  However, it is definitely on the to-do list.

6.  Getting help

We have created several types of training resources to help you navigate our new catalog. Our Online Catalog Help page includes short videos and text instructions for common tasks, as well as a print-friendly (PDF) guide to using your library account online.  Of course, if you’d rather get assistance from a live person, our reference librarians are always happy to help.  Give us a call (518-477-7476, option 4) or stop by at your convenience.

Again, we’d like to thank all of our patrons for their patience and understanding during this time of transition.  What are your thoughts on the new catalog?  Have you discovered a bug not discussed here?  Let us know in the comments.

The New Catalog – Week 1

encore

What’s Encore?

Last week, the Upper Hudson Library System (UHLS) upgraded its catalog and patron management software.  We were unable to remain with the old software, as the vendor had stopped supporting it years ago and it was really showing its age by failing in critical ways.  Moving to a new library management software is an enormous project that takes lots of planning and configuration.  In fact, the project has several phases, and it will remain ongoing for several months.  While the new software has many exciting features for both patrons and staff, many of them are not yet available and will roll out over time.

Phase One Complete

Because this was not simply an upgrade to our current software, but changing software entirely, much of the battle here was getting the data from our current system to move successfully and meaningfully to the new system.  I won’t bore you with the details, but at times this can be like trying to fit a square peg in a round hole.

The priority for our first day working live in the new system was to make sure that we could check items in and out and they would attach/remove appropriately with a patron’s account.  Now we are identifying glitches that may have occurred in translation (a.k.a. stuff that got lost or broken in the move) and working to fix them.  If you believe something may be amiss with your patron account (lost requests, inability to login to your account, etc.), please let us know ASAP so we can investigate and fix the issue.

Getting Help with the New System

Another part of phase one of the project is staff and patron education.  The library staff has been trained on the new software, but it will take time for us to get used to using it.  We truly appreciate your patience, as transactions at the checkout desk and information desk may take longer than usual.  If you would like help searching the catalog or managing your account, please see our catalog help page for videos, text, and a printable guide, or our YouTube channel for videos only.  If you would prefer to walk through the new catalog with a librarian, please visit the reference desk, and we’ll be happy to show you the finer points of the new catalog and answer any questions you may have.

Phase Two Underway

The next part of the project is to integrate the new software with our other library software and turn on additional features.  Here are some examples:

  • We have integrated our online article subscriptions (databases) with the catalog, making it possible to search for digital newspaper, magazine, and journal articles right alongside our physical books, music and movies.  Unfortunately, there is still a bit of an issue getting these articles to display consistently when accessed through the catalog.  Until we work this out, you can search the databases separately from our online resources page.
  • OverDrive, our service for downloading books, audiobooks, magazines and streaming video, is currently partially integrated into the catalog.  Some, but not all, titles show up with links that will open the separate OverDrive catalog for checkout.  In the coming weeks, a feature will become available that will show all current OverDrive titles and allow you to check them out without ever leaving the main catalog!
  • Libraries that use software for managing public computers, printing, self-check machines, and point-of-sale systems (taking payments) are working to make sure that this third party software communicates effectively with the new system.  At the East Greenbush Community Library, these particular services are up and running.  Your experience may vary at other libraries.

Known Issues

Aside from the issues above, the following missing features have been brought to our attention.  Issues we may be able to fix have been submitted to UHLS support.

  • The My Account login page does not offer an option to save your barcode. This has been addressed.  There is now a check box you can click if you would like the browser to remember your barcode.
  • The New Items feed is no longer available.  We are aware of how important this feature is to our patrons, but are unsure if this can be configured as part of the new system.  It is on the list of features to explore.
  • When viewing the catalog in the Internet Explorer browser, the input fields on the login page are too short (though they do accept a full barcode), and sometimes the popup windows become transparent and don’t respond to clicks.  So far, we have only seen these issues in IE.  If you experience these issues, we recommend using an alternate browser, such as Firefox or Chrome.

We Appreciate Your Feedback

As always, your feedback on the new system is important to us.  We want to make sure your library experience is a positive one.  In the first week, we received a lot of feedback at our service desks, which helped us report issues we may not have seen otherwise.  Have questions or comments about the new system?  Please let us know in the comments below.